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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
but looking at narrower product lines. but now in coming to the u.s., i can look at all the different product lines in one geographic market, so it's a different way of looking at the business. much more in the trenches of day-to-day business in the market rather than in the headquarters of the corporation. >> host: for samsung's products is the u.s. and canada, north america, a growth market? >> guest: it still is. i mean, traditionally we've thought developed markets and developing markets, and with developed markets it's being seen as someone mature. but if you look at the last few years of our progress in the u.s. market, we've seen tremendous growth. some of that is coming from new categories like the rise of the digital television or the growth of the phone business. some of it is as we pick up our market share. we're the fastest-growing brand in home appliances, for example, an area where samsung brand hasn't been as well known. but now bringing the same mix of innovation that we brought to televisions and phones, bringing new designs, now we can also grab business in home appliances.
at a narrower product line but now i'm coming to the u.s. i can look at all the different product lines in one geographic context so it's a different way of looking at the business. more in the trenches of day to day business in the market rather than in in the headquarters of the corporation. >> host: or samsung products is the u.s. and canada north america a growth market? >> guest: >> guest: it still lives. traditionally we have developed markets and these developed markets are seen as somewhat mature but if you look at the last few years at our programs in the u.s. market we have seen tremendous growth. some of that is coming from new categories like the rise of digital television or the growth of the phone business. some is a that we pick up market share with the fastest growing brand in home appliances for an example, an area where the samsung brand has not been as well-known but bringing the same mix of innovation that we brought to television to the phones, bringing it did not -- designs and now businesses and home imply innocence. >> host: what is the employment level in the u.s. for
. you've seen global responsibility but looking at narrower product lines. but in coming to the u.s., i can look at all the product lines in one geographic market. it's a different way of look k at the business. much more in the trenches than in the headquarters of the corporation. >> for samsung products s the u.s. and canada north america a growth market? >> it still is. traditionally we've thought about developed markets and developing markets. if you look at the last few years of our progress in the u.s. market, we've seen tremendous growth. some of that is coming from new categories like the rise of the digital television or the growth of the phone business. some of it is we pick up our market share in home appliances, an area where the samsung brand hasn't been as well known but bringing the same invasion we brought to television and phones, bringing the new design, now we can grab business in home appliances. >> what's the employment level in the us for samsung? >> we employ several thousands neem terms of sales and marketing and product design. we have a very large production ce
it is the policy of the u.s. government to end prove the and quality of cyber -- improve the quality of cyber security. our u.s. entities required to share my information with the government as well? >> the president can only direct executive branch agencies to take action. under the executive order, only the entities are on the federal side. we would like companies to share more information with the federal government. we are working to encourage them to do so. we are working to have that happen. that is an area where we need legislation to deal with some of the issues that are in that space to enable more information to flow back to the private sector and to the government that the text privacy and several -- protects privacy and civil liberties. >> the word voluntary is used for currently. >> yes. we look at the issues that we face in cyberspace. if you look at the problems and how the government has to deal with them, you see no one agency can deal with it. and needs to be a holistic approach. it is not just the federal government. it is federal, state, and local governments that deal wit
the future on the u.s. army. after that, the white house medal of honor ceremony. >> you are watching "the communicators" on c-span. we are on location at the ces 2013 international show in las vegas. here are some interviews this week. we want to introduce you to the new president and ceo of cable blabs. what is cable labs? >> it is the cable industry on a worldwide basis. we are the source of innovation that enables the cable operators to deliver services that you're quite familiar with such as broadband, video. >> you are not a cable guy. >> no. i'm with the cable industry and products. earlier in my career, -- i'm new to cable. -- you are the yo chief technology officer at -- >> correct. >> there in the -- my role at hp, we focused a lot on what the people do with the technology in their homes and in their hands and on their desk. being able to look at that from end to end. an innovator by back and. it is about coming up with those great i years and translating those two have high impacts. >> what are some products that you are excited about? >> we have been looking a
order issued earlier this month and the increasing number of cyber attacks on the u.s. from china. then a discussion about nuclear weapons in the middle east and america's declining influence in the region. after that we're live with the closing session of the nation's governors' annual winter meeting as they discuss personal responsibility in relation to government policies with their guest, tv's dr. oz. and later the senate returns at 2 eastern following its weeklong presidents' day recess when senator kelly ayotte delivers the annual reading of george washington's farewell address. >> at age 25, she was one of the wealthiest widows in the colonies, and during the revolution while many her mid '40s, she was of considered an enemy by the british who threatened to take her host aage. later she would become our nation's first first lady at age 57. meet martha washington tonight in the first program of c-span's new weekly series, "first ladies: influence and image." we'll visit some of the places that influenced her life including colonial williamsburg, mount vernon, valley forge an
cybersecurity information sharing you write, it is policy of the u.s. government to increase the volume timeliness and quality of cyberthreat information shared with u.s. private sector entities. our u.s. private sector entities required to share more information with the government as well? >> guest: under the executive order the president can only direct executive branch agencies to take action. so under the executive order the only entities that are directed to increase their sharing her on the federal side. we would like to see companies be able to share more information with the federal government and we are working to encourage them to do so and are working through ways to have that happen. i think that's one of the areas that we think we need legislation and to eventually deal with some of the issues that are in that space, to enable more integration to flow back into the private sector into the government in a way that protects privacy and civil liberties. that's very important to the administration's. but we do need to increase that information flow. >> host: throughout the exe
to ask you about u.s. jobs with panasonic. >> in north america, we have approximately 15,000 employees. >> to what capacity? >> everything from manufacturing to sales, marketing, r&d. a complete range of jobs that you would expect in any major corporation. >> when it comes to our the expect in terms, and -- when it comes to r&d, the have expenditures? >> there is a percentage, but it is not budgeted that way. we look at r&d business by business. we have fixed r&d sites in north america alone. >> is the north american market unique? >> we would like to think it is unique. what cannot be disputed is that it constitutes a percentage of gdp. it is by far the largest market in the world. in any state itself is the only developed nation on earth whose population is still growing. it makes it a very interesting market. it has some things in common with the emerging markets and the most competitive marketplace in the world. >> how much time do you spend on regulatory policy issues in washington, d.c.? >> as little as they possibly can. we have an organized nation of people who are capable of d
50 years for me, they should have done a lot better. >> host: want to ask you about u.s. jobs with panasonic. how many people are employed? >> guest: in north america right now we have approximately 15,000 employees. >> host: 15,000? >> guest: right. >> host: in what capacity? >> guest: well, everything from manufacturing through sales, marketing, engineering and r&d. a complete range of jobs that you would expect in any major corporation. >> host: when it comes to r&d expenditures, do you have a set amount or a set percentage that you put towards r&d? >> guest: we don't structure r&d that way, but it ends up to be kind of a percentage of revenue. but it isn't budgeted that way. we look at r&d business by business, and businesses that are growing spend more in r&d, and businesses that aren't growing or that we don't anticipate to grow perhaps we spend less. but we have six r&d sites in knot america alone. -- north america alone. >> host: is the north american market unique? >> guest: well, we like to think it's unique. but what's unique about north america, what can't be dispu
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)